A sense of longing

Lately I have been struggling to express myself creatively through photography. It’s that feeling that you have all these great ideas but there are other factors in life pulling you in so many other directions, leaving photography somewhat on the back burner.

I find myself longing so many times just to pick up my camera and shoot. I have gotten to do a few big projects in the past few months as well as work on some editorial work, but nothing close to what I would like to have done and I am left feeling drained both creatively and physically.

Many times I think about my desires for photography and how they shape my life daily. I think about ways to use photography to give back to the community around me, using it to invest in the lives of other photographers, as well as to push me to advancing further in my craft. But when I’m feeling drained, I don’t feel like I’m progressing in any of these areas, or at least not effectively.

This morning as I was reading through a couple of blog posts online I came across this quote on David duChemin’s blog,

“The batteries that keep my cameras working might as well die in the darkness of my camera bag if my personal batteries are not constantly recharged by the direct encounters with the natural world that first gave me the burning desire to interpret that experience in photographs.” Galen Rowell, The Inner Game of Outdoor Photography.

It was so easy for me to identify with this; I mean, Rowell has put into words something I have felt so many times. This leads me to the question, how do I charge my batteries?

It is so important that we are recharging our creative batteries. Whether that be through putting the camera down, picking it up to shoot some editorial work, or simply meeting up with some other creative people to talk over coffee, all of it works to recharge you when you are drained.

So I’m proposing that we all take a week to just refresh ourselves, my next shoot is this Saturday and I plan to be ready for it.

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